Professional-Looking DIY Slider

midwest-lenticular-printing-slider-a

DIY camera sliders are, of course, featured heavily on this site, but many of them don’t necessarily maintain the look or functionality of their more expensive “buy-it-yourself” brethren. Chris D wrote in on this angle iron slider post about his professional-looking DIY slider seen on Midwest Lenticular.

They feature a full parts list from Amazon and Servocity.com, two of my favorite online DIY parts retailers. At around $250, this DIY solution is more expensive than many of the rigs seen here, but compared to what something like this would cost normally (39 inch kit from Amazon for example), it’s quite inexpensive.

Check out the results after the “read more” link thing. Continue reading

Angle Iron Metal Slidecam and Rails

metal slidecam mount with DSLR

Camera sliders have been a running theme here at DIYTripods. This interesting metal slidecam version came in via a comment on this mostly-wooden slide mount. Apparently that video inspired the slide rail portion as seen below.

Unlike some other other contraptions seen here, the slider portion is made entirely of metal, with rivets attaching everything together. It can be used by itself, or it attaches nicely to the angle iron frame. It’s nice to see a dual-use setup like this that can be separated at will depending on the situation.

metal slidecam rails setup

Check out the build videos after the “read more” link for more explanation. Maybe it will inspire another build, which I’d love to hear about! Continue reading

Thermal Leak Detector Long Exposure Photography

thermal long exposure photograph of a Crock Pot

A little over a year ago, DIYTripods featured a technique for taking heat-sensitive long exposure photos using a modified flashlight. The photographic process behind this is explained there. This gave me an idea that one could use a Black & Decker TLD100 Thermal Leak Detector (Amazon) without modification to do the same thing.

The unit functions pretty simply. You turn it on pointed at whatever you want to appear normal temperature-wise, and it displays green.  Point it at something cooler and it becomes blue; point it at something hotter and it becomes red.  To make an infrared image, photograph your target while slowly sweeping the red-green-blue beam across, and you have a crude infrared photograph. Between 25 and 30 seconds of exposure seems to work well for me.

The one thing that is kind of tricky is that the color transition isn’t instantaneous, but it’s not impossible to work around. In addition to what’s above, I’ve taken some other interesting photos using this technique, as seen after the “read more” link. Continue reading